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Siemens Wind Power

Wind provides clean, renewable energy. The core concept is simple: wind turbines spin blades to generate power. However, today's systems are anything but simple. Modern wind turbines have blades that sweep a 120 meter circle, cost more than 1 million dollars and generate multiple megawatts of power. Each turbine may include up to 1,000 sensors and actuators – integrating strain gages, bearing monitors and power conditioning technology. The turbine can control blade speed and power generation by altering the blade pitch and power extraction. Controlling the turbine is a sophisticated job requiring many cooperating processors closing high-speed loops and implementing intelligent monitoring and optimization algorithms. But the real challenge is integrating these turbines so that they work together. A wind farm may include hundreds of turbines. They are often installed in difficult-to-access locations at sea. The farm must implement a fundamentally and truly distributed control system. Like all power systems, the goal of the farm is to match generation to load. A farm with hundreds of turbines must optimize that load by balancing the loading and generation across a wide geography. Wind, of course, is dynamic. Almost every picture of a wind farm shows a calm sea and a setting sun. But things get challenging when a storm goes through the wind farm. In a storm, the control system must decide how to take energy out of gusts to generate constant power. It must intelligently balance load across many turbines. And a critical consideration is the loading and potential damage to a half-billion-dollar installed asset. This is no environment for a slow or undependable control system. Reliability and performance are crucial.

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  • SUPPLIER
  • RTI
    RTI provides the connectivity platform for the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). RTI's solutions connect across field, fog and cloud. Its reliability, security, perfomance and scalability are proven in the most demanding industrial systems. Deployed systems include medical devices and imaging; wind, hydro and solar power; autonomous planes, trains and cars; traffic control; Oil and Gas; robotics, ships and defense. RTI is the largest vendor of products based on the Object Management Group (OMG) Data Distribution Service™ (DDS) connectivity framework.
  • INDUSTRIES
  • Energy
  • FUNCTIONS
  • Maintenance
  • CUSTOMER
  • Siemens Wind Power

  • CONNECTIVITY PROTOCOLS
  • SOLUTION
  • Siemens Wind Power is one of the world's largest wind turbine manufacturers. Siemens Wind Power decided to use an Industrial Internet-based solution powered by RTI Connext® DDS to integrate its systems. Industrial Internet with Connext DDS enables fast control within turbines, distributed gust mitigation across the array, and integration back to the control center for predictive maintenance and business diagnostics. With Connext DDS, a Siemens Wind Power farm is a smart, distributed machine. It optimizes power, monitors its own health and reacts to its environment. Industrial Internet with DDS provides fast communication and control within the turbines, distributed gust mitigation across the entire wind farm, and communication and integration with the back-end control center for predictive maintenance and business diagnostics.

  • DATA COLLECTED
  • Asset Performance, Asset Status Tracking, Energy Production, Power Output, Wind Speed
  • SOLUTION TYPE
  • SOLUTION MATURITY
  • Mature (technology has been on the market for > 5 years)
  • OPERATIONAL IMPACT
  • Impact #1
    [Process Optimization - Remote Control]
    Siemens can monitor and control wind farm arrays with up to 500 wind turbines.
    Impact #2
    [Process Optimization - Predictive Maintenance]
    The DDS real-time messaging and quality of service (QoS) characteristics enable Siemens to manage turbulence through the wind farm so that performance and wear is uniform in the highly distributed operational environment.
    Impact #3
    [Process Optimization - Real Time Monitoring]
    RTI Connext DDS platform’s ability to integrate smoothly with other systems, including business enterprise applications, will allow Siemens to remotely monitor and troubleshoot the wind farm's operations.
  • QUANTITATIVE BENEFIT
  • USE CASES
  • Process Control & Optimization (PCO)
    Process Control and Optimization (PCO) is the discipline of adjusting a process to maintain or optimize a specified set of parameters without violating process constraints.The PCO market is being driven by rising demand for energy efficient production processes, safety and security concerns, and the development of IoT systems that can reliably predict process deviations.Fundamentally, there are three parameters that can be adjusted to affect optimal performance:- Equipment optimizationThe first step is to verify that the existing equipment is being used to its fullest advantage by examining operating data to identify equipment bottlenecks.- Operating proceduresOperating procedures may vary widely from person-to-person or from shift-to-shift. Automation of the plant can help significantly. But automation will be of no help if the operators take control and run the plant in manual.- Control optimizationIn a typical processing plant, such as a chemical plant or oil refinery, there are hundreds or even thousands of control loops. Each control loop is responsible for controlling one part of the process, such as maintaining a temperature, level, or flow. If the control loop is not properly designed and tuned, the process runs below its optimum. The process will be more expensive to operate, and equipment will wear out prematurely. For each control loop to run optimally, identification of sensor, valve, and tuning problems is important. It has been well documented that over 35% of control loops typically have problems. The process of continuously monitoring and optimizing the entire plant is sometimes called performance supervision.
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